PCR | real-time PCR | qPCR
new and forthcoming publications ...
Virology
new and forthcoming publications ...
Genome analysis | Biotechnology
new and forthcoming publications ...
Newsletter

Lactobacilli in the Gastrointestinal Tract

Lactobacilli in the Gastrointestinal Tract. A review of current scientific research, applications and resources.
Bifidobacteria
Edited by: Baltasar Mayo and Douwe van Sinderen
Leading bifidobacteria experts from around the world provide a state-of-the art overview of the molecular biology and genomics of this exciting and important microbial genus.
"essential reading for every bifidobacteria researcher" (Beneficial Microbes); "covers the topic of Bifidobacterium extensively" (Doodys); "essential reading" (BIOspektrum); "well-written, informative and uses high-quality graphics" (Microbiology Today) read more ...

Lactobacilli in the Gastrointestinal Tract

Adapted from Jens Walter in Probiotics and Prebiotics: Scientific Aspects
Lactobacilli in the Gastrointestinal Tract: The majority of studies on intestinal lactobacilli, especially in the last two decades, have been focused on the behaviour of lactobacilli introduced into the gastrointestinal tract as probiotics and their in vitro characterization. Research on the ecology of lactobacilli naturally present within the complex gastrointestinal microbiota of humans and animals has received much less attention but is a crucial aspect of probiotic research and development. Molecular technologies have facilitated detection and identification of lactobacilli and allowed insight into the occurrence, diversity and dynamics of intestinal Lactobacillus populations. Animal models in combination with biochemical and genetic approaches have been used to reveal the influence of lactobacilli on the host, on microbiota-associated characteristics and on other members of the gut microbiota as well as to identify some bacterial factors that contribute to the ecological performance of lactobacilli in the gut. Functional and comparative genomics have already been carried out for some Lactobacillus strains in order to identify features essential for gut colonization and host-microbe co-existence. Research to decipher these ecological interactions is rewarding because it not only increases fundamental knowledge about the gut ecosystem and bacterial physiology in relation to host welfare but also provides valuable information to select lactobacilli for probiotics and other pharmaceutical applications.